[PROVISIONAL TRANSLATION FROM Persian]

 

[Translator’s notes appear in square brackets.]

[Personal information has been redacted.]

[The excerpt below is from the section of the article that pertains to the Baha’i Faith]

 

[Newspaper:] Mard-e Siasat

[Date:] 31 Ordibehesht 1334 [22 May 1955]

[Issue No.:] 9

 

The Fight Against Corruption Became Obsolete with the Fight Against the Baha’is

An important topic that still receives special attention from political analysts is the issue of the struggle against the Baha’is.

What all political experts agree on is that the mysterious influence of this political sect must be eradicated as soon as possible and an end put to their manipulation and demagoguery.

But why today? Have there not been better opportunities [before now]? Is the fight against the Baha’is the most acute social ill in the country right now, that it requires a remedy? Will the annihilation of this perverse sect put an end to the long history of misfortunes in this country?

Some people say that there has not been any accountability in this country for years…

 

The Clash Between Two Political Interests

The chaos in the country and the mysterious hands of foreign political interests have been barriers to fundamental political reform. Now that the influence of one of these political interests―whether in the military or in the government systems―has been mostly removed, and the leaders of other political interests no longer have a strong influence, and, overall, the internal and external conditions for carrying out in-depth reforms and cutting off the hands of embezzlers [illegible] of public funds have presented themselves, and the current cabinet has also been formed to achieve this same purpose and has based its plan of action on struggle against corruption, does the struggle against the Baha’is not overshadow all other important issues in the country?  And does it not divert the attention of the government from the struggle against corruption to struggle against the Baha’is?

In all cases, now that the struggle against the Baha’is has come to the attention of the people and the clergy and government, the destructive operations of this political party must end and the influence of this misguided people must be uprooted.

 

The Conspiracy of Land Grabbers

It is heard that the land-grabbers, some of whom are Jewish and Zoroastrian, and others of whom are influential men of the country and their partners and collaborators, have not been so ineffective in provoking emotions and intensifying the struggle against the Baha’is so as to divert the public attention from the issue of lands to that of the Bab and Baha, and let those who want to prevent them from further looting understand that the fight against land grabbing will involve greater and greater consequences.

We hope that the government will make a serious decision in this regard, and after being relieved from fighting against the Baha’is, in which it is now necessary to continue and succeed, to fight land grabbing with the right programme.

 

Conflict of Interest of Two Political Interests Eventually Led to Fight Against American Influence

It is rumoured that the fight against the Baha’is was not, and is not, unrelated to the law on foreign investment, as the only capitalists in the country who are currently able to invest part of their capital in Iran are the American capitalists.

Obviously, the money of any government is strengthened and supported by the policy of that government. This was seen as detrimental to other policies, and therefore mysterious hands were engaged to exploit the intense, long-standing and religious interests of Ayatollah Tabatabai Borujerdi and the clergy of the Muslim world, and to further provoke anti-Baha’i sentiment. In this way, [it is possible] to convince the Americans that there is still no security in Iran and that there is not enough security for the flow of foreign capital.

There is another narrative here, which is that the funds that were supposed to flow into Iran belonged to the Baha’is of the United States, and the struggle against the Baha’is of Iran discouraged them from using their funds.

But, no doubt, these are just rumours, and these pure religious sentiments, like the feelings expressed by the nation at the time of the nationalization of oil, are completely natural and religious, and the government must make maximum use of the law for the benefit of the country.