[PROVISIONAL TRANSLATION FROM Persian]

 

[Translator’s notes appear in square brackets.]

[Personal information has been redacted.]

[The excerpt below is from the section of the article that pertains to the Baha’i Faith]

 

[Newspaper:] Kayhan Havaei

[Date:] Wednesday 4 Bahman 1374, 24 January 1996

[Issue No:] 1166

[Page:] 5

 

The concern of the governmental and religious authorities of Almaty[1] regarding the incitements of the Baha’i sect in Kazakhstan

 

Tehran, 25 Dey, [15 January 1996] the archbishop of Almaty said, “In recent years some mysterious sects and groups, apparently religious, have started their activities in Kazakhstan, whose actions have brought some concern to the leaders of Islam and Christianity.” Alexi, the archbishop of Almaty, said, “In the present situation, some mysterious sects in Kazakhstan have found fertile ground for their activities and for disseminating their beliefs, and because people are attracted towards any extraordinary matter, especially if it is from the West, [they are] joining these groups.”

 

The archbishop said in an interview with the Caravan Newspaper, published in Almaty, “Although most of these sects have been banned in their own countries, they grow and spread in Kazakhstan. Religious and political authorities of Kazakhstan, including the president of the country, time and again have shown concerns about the activities of apparently religious groups and sects. While they have not mentioned the specific name of any sect, according to the allusions and statements of their previous standings, it is clear that their concerns about the growing activities in their country are the Baha’is and the sects of Eastern Asia”.

 

The president of Kazakhstan, Nursultan Nazarbayev, on 25 Azar of this year [16 December 1995] at his speech on the anniversary of the independence of the country, showed his concern much more clearly than before, and also mentioned that Archbishop Alexi had pointed out that many of these sects have been suppressed and banned in their own countries.  He also said that although there is liberty of religion in Kazakhstan, yet to let the religious sects grow, which have not been known before to our people, is a matter of concern, because their activities, as experience has shown in some other countries, are predictable.

 

In recent years, according to informal reports, many Baha’is have moved to the countries of Asia, Europe, and even Kazakhstan, and such reports reiterate that the Baha’is of this country are under the protection of the Zionist regime, where there is an active embassy.  According to this same report, there are 1,300 religious organizations and more than 30 active religions and religious sects in Kazakhstan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

[1] [Almaty -  a city in Kazakhstan]