[PROVISIONAL TRANSLATION FROM PERSIAN]

 

[Translator’s notes appear in square brackets.]

[Personal information has been redacted.]

[The excerpt below is from the section of the article that pertains to the Baha’i Faith]

 

[Adapted from website:] Jaras

[Date:] 16 Bahman 1389 [5 February 2011]

 

End Educational Discrimination Against Baha’is and Stop Depriving Them of Access to Education

Protest by the Right to Education Defence Council against Navid Khanjani’s Harsh Prison Sentence

The Right to Education Defence Council protests the harsh prison sentence for Navid Khanjani

JarasFollowing the sentencing to 12 years in prison of Navid Khanjani, a student deprived of education and a member of the Committee of Human Rights Reporters, the Right to Education Defence Council issued a statement condemning the academic discrimination in Iran and demanding the abolition Navid Khanjani’s sentence and the sentences of other students deprived of accessing education.

The above-mentioned statement, which was published on the Council’s website, said:

“The unfortunate process of issuing illegal and long-term prison sentences for students deprived of education continues. In recent days, Navid Khanjani, a student deprived of education, who is a member of the Committee of Human Rights Reporters and the Society for Combating Academic Discrimination, was sentenced by the Revolutionary Court of Tehran to twelve years in prison.”

In continuation of this statement, which was published on Saturday, 16 Bahman 1389 [5 February 2011], it is noted, “Depriving students of the right to education for ideological and political reasons is a clear violation of various principles of the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Iran, such as: paragraphs 3, 9 and 14 of Article 3 and Articles 19, 20, 22, 30, 36 and 37, and particularly Article 23 of this law, which explicitly states: ‘The investigation of individuals’ beliefs is forbidden, and no one may be molested or taken to task simply for holding a certain belief.’”

The statement said, “Deprivation of Baha’i students and other students of their basic right to education by government institutions for ideological and political reasons is based on an ‘illegal resolution of the extra-judicial and illegal institution of the Supreme Council of Cultural Revolution’. This [violation] is taking place in a situation where, in addition to the provisions of paragraph 3 of Article 3 and Article 30 of the Constitution, oblige the government to facilitate and generalize higher education as well as to expand free higher education facilities for the general public. According to paragraphs 9 and 14 of Article 3 as well as Articles 20, 22, 30, 36 and 37 of the Constitution, the government is obliged to create fair opportunities for the people of the nation to enjoy all human, political, social and cultural rights, regardless of [their] religion, beliefs and political ideology, while eliminating undue discrimination.”