[PROVISIONAL TRANSLATION FROM PERSIAN]

 

[Translator’s notes appear in square brackets.]

[Personal information has been redacted.]

[The excerpt below is from the section of the article that pertains to the Baha’i Faith]

 

[Adapted from website:] HRANA - Human Rights Activists News Agency

[Date:] 10 Mordad 1392 [1 August 2013]

 

HRANA: Letter from Kamran Rahimian, an Imprisoned Baha’i Citizen, to His Son Artin

HRANA News Agency - Kamran Rahimian, a Baha’i university lecturer, sentenced to four years in prison under Tazir[1] law, in a letter to his young son, who now lives with his relatives after his mother was sentenced and imprisoned, wrote: “Artin, for a long time, I have been thinking, what makes me want to know and learn from Mandela and Gandhi, and what makes me not make the same effort to know Rumi and Kharaqani? What makes me look for the book ‘A Man’ and not to look for the ‘Panjah-o Seh Nafar [Fifty-Three Persons]’ and many other examples?”

A copy of the full text of this letter was provided to HRANA News Agency and you can read it below:

Artin

I write to you every week, and do not know what these letters will mean to you years later when you grow up and what will be their value to you. I wonder if it will be something like Nehru’s book, “Glimpses of World History”, because I am not thinking about teaching at all but keeping in touch is the most important thing for me.

Artin, for a long time, I have been thinking, what makes me want to know and learn from Mandela and Gandhi, and what makes me not make the same effort to know Rumi and Kharaqani? What makes me look for the book ‘A Man’ and not look for the ‘Panjah-o Seh Nafar [Fifty-Three Persons]’, and many other examples?

I believe and know that many people around me are individuals waiting for the opportunity to know them, to be with them and do something for them. I believe that the names of many of these people have been recorded in history; many have learned a lot from them and many others are eager to accompany them.

In 1360 [1981], when I was 12 years old, I first met one of these people because of my father, my mother and their friends. Sometimes they stayed in our house, and many came for a visit to our house; and from those many memories, some have remained in my mind.

He [Mr. Khanjani; see last paragraph] was supposed to come to see my mother’s friend, Jinous Mahmoudi, who was our guest for a few days, and he had not found our address, although I think it was quite clear. They sent me to the door several times and even at the crossroads to find the man who was looking for our address. Of course, he had found it before I returned home.

This was the first time he came to our house and I met him, and on the last occasion it was a few days before my father was arrested in Ordibehesht 1362 [April 1983] after which he did not come to our house anymore. I used to see him every now and then; through a particular incident his name became more famous every day, the risk of his arrest increased, and probably the burden of responsibilities on his shoulders over the years was even heavier. During all these years, I was impressed by what I heard about his work, his decisions and… I became sad and shed tears, sometimes admiring him and sometimes approving his doings.

In Azar 1390 [December 2011], when I was entering the Hall 12 of Rajaei-Shahr Prison, I was more eager than anyone to see him. During this time, I was with him on his walks; sometimes I only watched him, sometimes I heard his prayers, a few times I saw his tears, sometimes I saw his anger and sometimes his support, and during this period, what I most admired about him was his belief in prayer, his love for his faith, his hope for reconstruction, and his will to spend his life unconditionally in the way of his belief.

This is a small manifestation of the existence of the oldest person in Hall 12 of Rajaei-Shahr Prison. He turns 80 today. He is Jamaloddin Khanjani.

Blessed be his birthday for him, his family and for history.

Baba [Daddy] Kamran

5 Mordad 1392 [27 July 2013]

 

 

[1] [Ta‘zir (discretionary punishment):  Punishment with maximum and minimum limits determined by law and judge, respectively.]