[PROVISIONAL TRANSLATION FROM Persian]

 

[Translator’s notes appear in square brackets.]

[Personal information has been redacted.]

[The excerpt below is from the section of the article that pertains to the Baha’i Faith]

 

[Newspaper:] Azadegan-e Shargh

[Date:] 29 Ordibehesht 1334 [20 May 1955]

[Issue No.:] 63

 

Do Not Provoke!

When you exercise your right to freedom of expression, you should also consider the public policy of the country, and he [Falsafi] should also observe the general interests of the country when using the right to freedom of expression and propaganda…

Although we have written our views in general on the current trend, namely the religious discourses of Mr. Falsafi and the vilification of Baha’ism, in a separate article, reading the contents of ‘Sahar Newspaper’ forced us not to refrain from expressing a neutral and friendly remark...

... Because in our opinion, one of the greatest causes of backwardness of the people of our country and one of the most important factors of the moral degeneration, is lack of courage, bravery and frankness. We also believe that we should express the words and hear the answers; everyone should express his opinion explicitly and avoid hesitation, doubt, fear and perplexity.

However, this opinion of ours—that is, encouraging individuals to express courage and bravery—should not be interpreted as saying that everyone should consider his opinion to be the most correct belief, and that, since they allowed him to express his opinion freely, he must therefore consider the people obliged to follow and obey that belief as well.

In any case, we commend the [writer at] the Sahar Newspaper for not being afraid to express his personality and reveal his personal opinion, but we are obliged to give him a friendly warning; so, from the point of view of the journalism [profession], it should be considered as a technical and professional recommendation…

When the government states that it will fight all propaganda and demonstrations against Islam, which is the official religion of the country, when the government says that it will prevent any incidence of disorder and disturbance with all its might, all the people, all the clerics, accept this promise of the government and are convinced. What else is there for us and for you [other than] to blow up the old harvest and create rancour?

Dear Colleague: we, you and Mr. Falsafi are all fighting to guide the people. All of us are fighting for the national unity of Iran and for the glory of our beloved homeland, and there is no doubt that in this path we must respect the country’s common interests in the best possible way.

Today, the whole world is watching us to see what we—who call ourselves a peaceful country and a progressive and civilized nation—are going to do. Would it not be better to leave the task to the experts and let the government do its job, as it deems fit, by exchanging ideas with the wise men of the people and to perform its duties and responsibilities? Is not that better? ...