[PROVISIONAL TRANSLATION FROM PERSIAN]

 

[Translator’s notes appear in square brackets.]

[Personal information has been redacted.]

[The excerpt below is from the section of the article that pertains to the Baha’i Faith]

 

[Adapted from website:] Ayande Roshan

[Date:] 17 Azar 1386 [8 December 2007]

 

Maxwell International Baha’i School on the Verge of Closure

Maxwell International School, one of the largest and most important Baha’i schools in Canada, is on the verge of closure for a number of reasons.

According to the Ayande Roshan report, the Baha’i-owned school, which was established in Canada nineteen years ago, is on the verge of closing due to what the Baha’i Assembly of Canada has declared the school’s inability to gain financial independence.

The National Assembly of the Baha’is of Canada, in a letter to students, board, parents and supporters of the school, published on the school’s official website, stated that despite much consultation with the Baha’i Universal House of Justice in Haifa, this Assembly has decided to close this school at the end of the current academic year.

Karen McKay wrote in the letter, “When Maxwell opened 19 years ago, it was clearly expected that the school would quickly become (financially) self-sufficient and not rely on the public financial resources of Baha’i communities. Unfortunately, this did not happen, and despite many dedicated efforts and on-going projects, the school’s financial situation is clearly deteriorating. It was in the light of these financial facts that the National Assembly, with a broken heart, decided to close the school.”

Although it has been mentioned that the reasons for the school’s closure are financial problems and lack of financial self-sufficiency, this seems highly suspicious. [It] is not far-fetched [to say that] there may be other reasons behind this, given that the Baha’is have always had vast financial resources, and that the political character of Baha’is and their close ties to the governments of Israel and America, [their] politicization or, more likely, the Baha’is’ problems in justifying the sect’s existence and propaganda, [may be to blame].