[PROVISIONAL TRANSLATION FROM PERSIAN]

 

[Translator’s notes appear in square brackets.]

[Personal information has been redacted.]

[The excerpt below is from the section of the article that pertains to the Baha’i Faith]

 

[Adapted from website:] Taghato

[Date:] 18 Shahrivar 1393 [9 September 2014]

 

Rank 113 in Mathematics in National University Entrance Examination Not Selected Due to Being a Baha’i

Taghato: On Monday night (17 Shahrivar - 8 September) after entering her information on the Sanjish[1] organization website to learn the result of her selected field, Shadan Shirazi, a Baha’i girl who ranked 113 in this year’s National University Entrance Examination in mathematics and technology, was faced with the message that she should go to the address of the Sanjish organization in Karim Khan Zand Street in Tehran.

Today, upon visiting this organization, she wrote a letter to the Council for Student Placement in which she reported that she had been denied admission to the university because of her religious beliefs, even though she had not even been questioned about these beliefs at any stage.

It is worth mentioning that Baha’is have continued to be denied entry to universities after taking the National University Entrance Examination, as in previous years. Ruhiyyeh Safajou, for example, another Baha’i girl, did not receive her National University Examination rank and was asked to go to the office of the Sanjish organization in Karaj. Her appeal that has gone unanswered so far, and even her request for follow-up, just like those of other Baha'i volunteers, has not been registered by the organization’s staff.

About three weeks ago (25 Mordad- 17 August), this Baha’i girl [Shadan Shirazi], after one of her inconclusive visits to the Sanjish organization, turned her Facebook page into a site for pursuing the right to education for herself and her other Baha’i friends. She wrote, “I know that my letters do not reach anyone, and my voice will still not be heard… but on my birthday, I made a vow and will stand by my vow… Please see me… I am the one who has been deprived of education… the same one whose file has been pulled out several times during her studies at school for defending herself against slanders and humiliation… the same one whose father was taken to prison for answering people’s questions regarding his religion… the same one whose brother was expelled for being a Baha’i… Yes, I am the one whose mother was imprisoned in the prime of her youth… I am the one whose father and mother were expelled from school due to being Baha’is... I am the one whose father’s name was given to him with difficulty, because it related to a Baha’i historical figure… See me and hear my voice.”

Previously, in a letter to Hassan Rouhani, the president of the Islamic Republic, she requested that he fulfil his promises. She wrote, “Dear Mr. Rouhani, I am not asking you to return my expelled brother, father, mother, uncles and their spouses, aunts and their spouses and all my cousins to the university, from this large family, I am only asking you to let me go to university; this will be enough for me to be able to believe that you stand by your promise.”

It is worth mentioning that the denial of education for Baha’is in Iranian universities is based on the decree of the Supreme Council of the Cultural Revolution on 6 Esfand 1369 [25 February 1991], in which it deprives Baha’is of university education and employment in public offices.

According to the third paragraph of this decree, not only should Baha’is not be enrolled in universities, but they should also be deprived of studying if their Baha’i identity is established after enrolment and while studying.

 

 

 

 

[1] [Sanjish:  Educational Assessment and Evaluation Organization]