[PROVISIONAL TRANSLATION FROM PERSIAN]

 

[Translator’s notes appear in square brackets.]

[Personal information has been redacted.]

[The excerpt below is from the section of the article that pertains to the Baha’i Faith]

 

[Adapted from website:] Roshangar Study Foundation

[Date:] 6 Bahman 1398 [26 January 2020]

 

Hojjatieh Society and the Fight Against Baha’ism

Sheikh Mahmoud Halabi used to emphasize that the religious duty of all is to fight against Baha’ism. They believed that the main enemy of Islam was Baha’ism. It is true that the Baha’is carried out extensive propaganda and were able to quickly infiltrate the Pahlavi government and occupy many key positions in the country. But with […]

Sheikh Mahmoud Halabi used to emphasize that the religious duty of all is to fight against Baha’ism. They believed that the main enemy of Islam was Baha’ism. It is true that the Baha’is carried out extensive propaganda and were able to quickly infiltrate the Pahlavi government and occupy many key positions in the country. Nevertheless, the Hojjatieh Society, according to its statute, considered the struggle against the Baha’is only in the form of scientific and cultural activities within the framework of the rules and regulations of the Pahlavi government.

Martyr Seyyed Abdul-Karim Hasheminejad, in criticizing the society, said, “It was not like the regime telling you go and absolutely fight Baha’ism. If these gentlemen claim that they also have fought Baha’ism, they will be flattering

“Baha’ism had three dimensions: 1- Economic dimension 2- Political dimension 3- Intellectual dimension. Note the fact that they were not allowed to fight in the political and economic dimensions whatsoever, and the regime would strongly and firmly prevent them. Could they even talk about Pepsi-Cola, which belonged to Sabet Pasal? Could they talk about companies that were economically owned by the Baha’is? Not at all! The regime had given a red light here, and these gentlemen, in their view, I do not say committed treason, but did not clash with the regime. Their vision was to go slowly, so that there would not be a confrontation! Therefore, economically, they did not and could not have a struggle with Baha’ism. It was the same in the political dimension; could they ask Mr. Hoveyda, why are some of your cabinet ministers Baha’is? Not at all! They would say ‘none of your business!’ So, where did they fight and did the regime allow them? Only in the intellectual dimension!” (See note 1)

(1) Political Biography of Martyr Hasheminejad, Hassan Jalali Azizian, Islamic Revolution Document Center, pp. 279-280